Harris Funeral Homes Supreme Court

The appeals court said in its ruling that Title VII applies in his case because discrimination based on sexual orientation “is a subset of sex discrimination. Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. In this case, a woman named Aimee Stephens was fired. to provide food and shelter. Nessel declines to offer opinion on Elliott-Larsen due to SCOTUS case Court documents include Rost’s testimony that he fired Stephens because she “was no longer going to represent himself as a man” and would “dress as a woman. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in two of the term’s most closely watched cases over whether federal civil rights law protects LGBT people from job discrimination. (Distributed) SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 1 First Street, NE Washington,. Last month, The Daily Citizen reported on a massively important Supreme Court case that will be argued on October 8. WASHINGTON — A seemingly divided Supreme Court struggled Tuesday over whether a landmark civil rights law protects LGBT owner of the Detroit-area R. In that case, a man named Aimee Stephens sued his previous employer, the R. The day before, I received what appeared to be a standard. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. FERNDALE, Michigan (AP) — Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. , which is a closely held for-profit corporation that operates several funeral homes in Michigan. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. Harris Funeral Homes, based in Detroit, Michigan. Harris Funeral Homes, whose owner worries that a ruling for Stephens also would prohibit sex-specific sleeping facilities in shelters, as well as. Oral arguments were heard on October 8, 2019. The Supreme Court on Tuesday will consider whether Stephens and thousands of transgender Americans are protected from employment discrimination under the attorney for Harris Funeral Homes. This fall the Supreme Court will hear the case of EEOC v. Oct 08, 2019 · Funeral home owner Tom Rost speaks outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, October 8, 2019, as the Court holds oral arguments in three cases dealing with workplace discrimination based on. Supreme Court on Oct. Harris Funeral Homes argues that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act doesn’t protect people on the basis of gender identity, but a federal appellate court disagreed. Harris Funeral Homes v. This week at the Supreme Court, oral arguments were given in a case (Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris was born on August 17, 1962. Equal Employment Opportunity. Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court to Permit Employment Discrimination Against Transgender Workers. Trump administration tells Supreme Court to make discriminating against trans people legal In a brief submitted in the case of R. Harris Funeral Homes, in which it will decide whether Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity. In addition to the Zarda and Bostock cases, the Supreme Court is set to hear R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. If the Supreme Court sides with the EEOC, there may be many repercussions. EEOC — were each updated on Nov. Harris Funeral Homes v. If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the LGBTQ workers at the center of these cases,. lawyer Greg Antollino and with Pam Karlan of the Stanford Law School Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. In their brief, the coalition argues that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination against transgender people or on the basis of sexual orientation. In that case, Tom Rost, owner of Harris Funeral Homes, chose to part ways with. Supreme Court. At issue is whether the 1964 Civil Rights Act covers transgender people. Harris Funeral Homes for six years and had a excellent work record. The court was considering the case of Aimee Stephens, who had worked for R. , as a funeral director for six. The District Court also argued that since Harris is a devout Christian who runs the company under his religious convictions, per the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, Harris is within his legal right to terminate. This case centered on transgender woman, Aimee Stephens, who alleges that she was fired from the funeral home that had employed her for six years after coming out as a trans woman to her boss. Former Roberts Clerk Will Argue Against LGBT Workers in New SCOTUS Term Consovoy McCarthy partner Jeffrey Harris will make his U. Harris Funeral Homes. Visitors stand outside the U. To that end— and to ensure clients focus on processing grief, not on the funeral home and its staff—Harris's employees agree to follow a professional, sex-specific dress code,. Huge transgender case will be heard by Supreme Court in October The U. Harris Funeral Homes unlawfully discriminated against Aimee Stephens when it fired her after she told her employer that she would begin presenting as a woman because she is transgender. In three cases, Bostock v. The EEOC sued the funeral home in 2014. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled for him. Clayton County, Georgia , center on men who say they were fired from their jobs for being gay, with a third case, R. Harris Funeral Homes petitioned the U. In the funeral home case, it was about how the term ‘sex’ is to be viewed in the realm of gender identity. In Harris Funeral Home, Inc. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. In a unanimous decision in EEOC v. Jun 11, 2019 · The Supreme Court is slated to hear the case of a transgender employee who was fired from a Detroit-area funeral home after informing the owner of plans to transition from male to female and begin. The Trump administration recently filed a brief in this case arguing that the Supreme Court should overturn the Sixth Circuit’s decision and rule that it’s legal to. harris funeral homes v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in two of the term's most closely watched cases over whether federal civil rights owner of the Detroit-area R. 8, I had the privilege of representing Harris Funeral Homes at the U. (Distributed) SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 1 First Street, NE Washington,. Supreme Court weighs first LGBTQ cases since Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement. If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the LGBTQ workers at the center of these cases,. The Harris Funeral Home case involves plaintiff Aimee Stephens, who was fired for being transgender. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. This fall the Supreme Court will hear the case, which seeks to overturn a lower court’s ruling that the funeral home discriminated again Stephens. Harris Funeral Homes in Michigan for nearly six years, appearing as a man and using the name she was given at birth, until she informed her employer in 2013 that she was transgender and would begin living. That case has made it all the way to the Supreme Court, where arguments will be heard in the upcoming term. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals held that Title VII protected a trans woman, Aimee Stephens, who had been fired from the funeral home at which she worked. EEOC, presents a similar question to Zarda and Bostock. Two of the cases, Altitude Express Inc. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. A lower court initially ruled in favor of Harris Funeral Homes, but the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision and held that the federal anti-employment discrimination law protects workers from being fired because they are transgender. On the other side of the case is the R. Since the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the rulings in the three most significant wins for lesbian and gay people in 1993, 2013 and 2015, these are the first major LGBT cases to come before the U. "Everyone understood in 1964 [when the Civil Rights Act passed] that sex meant biological sex," says John Bursch who argued on behalf of Harris Funeral Homes in the Supreme Court. In their brief, Raoul and the coalition argue that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination. Zarda; and R. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes appealed to the Supreme Court. The funeral home relied heavily on the 2014 U. The Supreme Court agreed to take up the transgender rights case along with two consolidated cases on gay rights, Bostock v. Supreme Court Cases - R. The Supreme Court will decide in both cases whether the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 includes discrimination based on an individual's sexual orientation. "With the support of my loving wife, I have decided to become the person. Jeff Merkely, ACLU of Oregon and Basic Rights Oregon, a local LGBTQ rights nonprofit, held a. The court also ruled that Title VII’s worker protections overcame any burden to the funeral home owner’s religious beliefs. Harris Funeral Homes owner Thomas Rost, that. The nub of the case is as follows: Aimee Stephens worked for over five years as a funeral director at the R. Respondent: Aimee Stephens; Oral Argument. Harris Funeral Homes confronts a legal issue that is genuinely uncertain in the wake of a Supreme Court decision. But now the meaning of “sex” has been contested all the way up to the Supreme Court. The chairmen of three U. The more prominent of these three cases is Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral. Harris Funeral Homes v. Funeral Director Daily take: While the business of death care is busy 24/7 every day of the year, it is kind of unique that the funeral or cemetery profession has a case that will get this much attention in front of our Supreme Court, and be one of the cases that cause the justices to decide landmark rules on the definitions of discrimination. The owner told him he could not present as a woman at work. The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in two of the term's most closely watched cases over whether federal civil rights owner of the Detroit-area R. Services unique as life Everyone’s life holds special stories that make them who they are. EEOC is one of the dozens of cases where transgender people who have faced discrimination have won in federal court. Thomas Rost, owner of R. Supreme Court is set to hear a case this fall that could help protect these rights for women and girls. Clayton County, Georgia; Altitude Express, Inc. Stephens' employment was terminated after she informed the funeral home's owner that she would transition from male to female. EEOC , the court will decide whether Title VII bars discrimination against transgender people based on either their status as transgender or stereotyping. The Supreme Court's decisions should determine whether discrimination against employees based upon their sexual orientation, gender identity and/or transgender status violates federal law. Bostock and Zarda, meanwhile, also contend that they were fired in violation of Title VII’s protections. EEOC and, separately, Atltitude Express v. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. The latest Tweets from AllianceDefends (@AllianceDefends). Supreme Court not to redefine “sex” in civil rights law, arguing this would change the definition of. Sign up for the daily. Harris Funeral Homes has helped families in Detroit navigate the grieving process for more than a century. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. The case of Aimee Stephens, R. In addition to the Zarda and Bostock cases, the Supreme Court is set to hear R. The issue went to court after the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) determined the funeral home had violated Title VII of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which protects employees from discrimination. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission," tests whether a Christian funeral director can be forced by the. Harris Funeral Homes v. 2018), the Sixth Circuit held that Title VII prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. " She spent nearly six years as a licensed funeral home director and embalmer at the company's Garden City, Michigan, location. The Supreme Court, returning this week for the beginning of its 2019-2020 term, heard oral argument Tuesday in three cases asking it to decide whether the definition of sex in U. EEOC, the Supreme Court will decide if LGBTQ+ employees are entitled to workplace protection under. He graduated from Phillips High School and escorted for many years for Pilgrim’s Pride. One notable supporter of Harris Funeral Homes is the U. Supreme Court will hear arguments today in a case involving a funeral home director who wanted to pretend to be a woman at work. Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. Title VII of the law says employers cannot dismiss people “because of sex. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. Second Circuit Court of Appeals said that sexual orientation is covered by Title VII. Oral arguments were heard on October 8, 2019. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Harris Funeral Homes, and his wife address the media at the United States Supreme Court in Washington on Tuesday, Oct. This case centered on transgender woman, Aimee Stephens, who alleges that she was fired from the funeral home that had employed her for six years after coming out as a trans woman to her boss. 17-1618, respondents in No. The subsequent series of events have taken Stephens from the prep room of a Michigan funeral home to the Supreme Court, where today the justices heard the case R. Heyer and the other eight ex-transgenders are responding specifically to the Sixth Circuit's ruling on the case titled R. EEOC, the case of an individual who says they were fired for being transgender and sued citing Title VII. Just recently, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in R. The article offers the author's insights on the decision of the Supreme Court of Mississippi in the Coleman Funeral Home v. That case out of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals sided with a funeral home worker who had been discriminated against by her employer on the basis of her identity as a transgender individual. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes, whose owner worries that a ruling for Stephens also would prohibit sex-specific sleeping facilities in shelters, as well as. EEOC ) that could have disastrous implications for girls sports everywhere. HARRIS FUNERAL. In the funeral home case, it was about how the term ‘sex’ is to be viewed in the realm of gender identity. RG and GR Harris Funeral Homes and Tom Rost goes to the US Supreme Court | ADF Client Film - Duration: 3:49. The Supreme Court's decisions should determine whether discrimination against employees based upon their sexual orientation, gender identity and/or transgender status violates federal law. EEOC and AIMEE STEPHENS , Aimee Stephens worked as a funeral director at R. As the court's order list states, the scope of the court's review of the Harris Funeral Homes case is limited to only question "whether Title VII prohibits discrimination against transgender. involved Aimee Stephens, who was fired. Supreme Court is set to hear a case this fall that could help protect these rights for women and girls. EEOC, the Department of Justice argued that employers should be allowed to force female employees to wear skirts, if the employer was. Nebraska has asked the U. Harris Funeral Homes v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission et al. Key Question in Detroit Funeral Home Case at Supreme Court: Can We Rely on the Law? The fate of a century-old Detroit mainstay hangs in the balance before the U. The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in R. , case number 18-107, all before the U. The Supreme Court agreed to take up the transgender rights case along with two consolidated cases on gay rights, Bostock v. 8, 2019, will hear oral arguments in her case. Aimee Stephens is the plaintiff in “R. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit found that the owner of the funeral home, Thomas Rost, had violated the law when he fired Aimee Stephens, a transgender woman who worked for the company from 2007 to 2013. Aimee Stephens said she was fired from her job at a family-run funeral home in Detroit after she returned from a vacation as a woman. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. Harris Funeral Homes, the employer’s religious freedom won out over the rights of a transgender employee. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The court then heard oral argument in R. It is titled R. 17-1623, and respondent Aimee Stephens in No. Harris Funeral Home in Garden City after disclosing her decision to transition from a man. It found that the federal government could force a funeral home to allow a male employee who identifies as a woman to wear women’s clothing when meeting with the deceased person’s grieving family. The Supreme Court grappled at times on Tuesday with historic cases that could impact millions of LGBTQ Americans. Zarda has since died. EEOC centers on a man who was fired after he announced he had changed his name and would now be coming to work as a woman. | (Photo: RG&GR Harris Funeral Homes). Coming this Autumn Will the Supreme Court expand protections for LGBT workers? Georgia and R. The District Court ruled in favor of the funeral home, saying that "sex" under Title VII does not include transgender identity. This time, it's in front of the U. Harris Funeral Homes v. (ADF) will argue the case for Harris Funeral Homes before the US Supreme Court. The issue went to court after the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) determined the funeral home had violated Title VII of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which protects employees from discrimination. Supreme Court for more than half a century as requiring that women can't be treated less favorably than men. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. The case is R. The funeral home is being represented by the anti-LGBTQ Alliance Defending Freedom, which appealed the case to the Supreme Court. Respondent: Aimee Stephens; Oral Argument. The Harris Funeral Homes case originated when a male employee of a funeral home wanted to start presenting as a woman. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission , will be argued in front of the U. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. The Harris Funeral Home could ask the full Sixth Circuit to reconsider the panel decision — that is, to rehear it en banc. Harris Funeral Homes told owner Tom Rost of a longstanding struggle with gender dysphoria. Funeral home owner Tom Rost speaks outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, October 8, 2019, as the Court holds oral arguments in three cases dealing with workplace discrimination based on. Hugh Hewitt invites Kristen Waggoner, senior vice president of U. Each case hinges on Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits employers from discriminating against employees based on sex. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes v. Thomas Rost, owner of R. Oct 08, 2019 · Funeral home owner Tom Rost speaks outside the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, October 8, 2019, as the Court holds oral arguments in three cases dealing with workplace discrimination based on. In the Zarda case, the U. 3d 560 (6th Cir. The Supreme Court will hear Stephens' case Oct. The court then heard oral argument in R. EEOC and Aimee Stephens, involves a male funeral home director who was fired when he said he was going to dress like a woman while working at a Christian funeral home. The district court held, “Since [the owner] cannot in good conscience ‘support the idea that sex is a changeable social construct,’ forcing him to allow a male funeral director to present as a woman while representing Harris Homes ‘would impose a substantial burden’ on [his] ability ‘to conduct his business in accordance with his. , which is a closely held for-profit corporation that operates several funeral homes in Michigan. Title VII of the. Harris, which I argued before the Supreme Court on Oct. This fall, the U. The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals held that 1) the Funeral home had unlawfully discriminated against Stephens on the basis of her sex, 2) the Funeral Home had failed to show that applying Title VII would substantially burden Rost’s religious exercise under RFRA, and 3) even if Rost’s religious exercise had been substantially burdened. EEOC, the Department of Justice argued that employers should be allowed to force female employees to wear skirts, if the employer was. Ex-Garden City funeral home worker’s case going to US Supreme Court. Harris Funeral Homes is a fifth-generation family business, serving. Blanket Consent filed by Petitioner, R. The Harris Funeral Homes case originated when a male employee of a funeral home wanted to start presenting as a woman. Sky-diving, a Funeral Home, and a County. The Supreme Court will hear three cases that could be instrumental in the fight for LGBTQ rights. , that stated she is transgender and would be dressing in accordance with the funeral home's female. Harris Funeral Homes v. Harris Funeral Homes owner Thomas Rost, that. The US Supreme Court will today hear a historic transgender civil rights case, to determine whether it is legal to fire someone for being trans. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Harris Funeral Homes. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. And that brings us to Harris Funeral Homes v. Funeral Home Asks US Supreme Court to Hear Appeal of Ruling Asserting Owner ‘Illegally’ Fired Man Who Wanted to Dress as Woman By Heather Clark on July 20, 2018 No Comment. Title VII of the. It was announced this week that the U. a lawyer representing the R. EEOC on October 8; today. Funeral homes make arrangements for services and memorials following the death of a loved one. Harris Funeral Homes, a company that was sued by a male employee who announced that he was going to begin living life (and dressing) as a woman, but was told he could not do so at work. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. The outcome of those cases likely will significantly affect other court cases, federal. 17-1618, respondents in No. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Funeral directors are the face of the company, which has served thousands of Detroit-area families since 1910. This case centered on transgender woman, Aimee Stephens, who alleges that she was fired from the funeral home that had employed her for six years after coming out as a trans woman to her boss. It's hard to get a case in front of the Supreme Court. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that prohibits. It was announced this week that the U. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit ruled that the federal government can force R. Harris Funeral Homes v. Funeral Home Asks US Supreme Court to Hear Appeal of Ruling Asserting Owner ‘Illegally’ Fired Man Who Wanted to Dress as Woman By Heather Clark on July 20, 2018 No Comment. On the other side of the case is the R. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission before ruling on whether Title VII as worded bars discrimination against. The dockets for the three Supreme Court cases — Altitude Express v. He wrote to his supervisor, explaining that he was taking a vacation and explaining his plans to transition to a female. She complained that the instructor had touched her inappropriately. Harris Funeral Homes vs. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit ordered R. FERNDALE, Michigan (AP) — Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. By Dutch Sheets of www. violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 when its owner terminated the employment of Aimee Stephens because of her status as a. The prospects for victory or defeat To win at case at the Supreme Court, one must have the support of at least five justices. Harris Funeral Homes, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the biological male, Aimee Stephens, was protected. EEOC, the petitioners will ask for reversals. v Zarda and Bostock v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Harris Funeral Homes announcing his intention to return to work after a two-week vacation as his “true self,” Aimee Stephens, a transgender female. The case involves Aimee Stephens, a funeral director who was fired in 2013 from her job at R. Harris Funeral Homes in Michigan for nearly six years, appearing as a man and using the name she was given at birth, until she informed her employer in 2013 that she was transgender and would begin living. In Harris Funeral Homes, the 6 th U. Supreme Court, the Office of the Solicitor General argued the opposite—that no federal law forbids employers from firing. It comes in the case of R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. Harris Funeral Homes v. It is titled R. The dispute before the high court arose in 2013, when a funeral director at R. The Supreme Court will decide in both cases whether the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 includes discrimination based on an individual's sexual orientation. The Supremes' answer could have enormous. The Supreme Court will determine whether Title VII prohibits discrimination against transgender persons based on their status as transgender or sex stereotyping. For almost 100 years, the ACLU has worked to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Amid her legal fight, her health is failing. But the third case on the court's docket, R. a lawyer representing the R. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court hears arguments this morning (Tuesday) on a case out of Michigan involving a funeral home that fired a male employee for coming to work dressed as a woman. Lapin, Harvey I. EEOC: Aimee Stephens worked as a funeral director at R. In 2007, the owner of a small funeral home in Michigan who describes himself as a devout Christian hired an individual, Aimee Stephens, who identified as a man. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. Today, the U. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The Supremes' answer could have enormous. This week at the Supreme Court, oral arguments were given in a case (Harris Funeral Homes v. Supreme Court held two hours of intense arguments about whether the main federal job-discrimination law protects gay, lesbian, and transgender employees. Activists are rallying outside in D. It comes in the case of R. The administration is making those same arguments to the Supreme Court now in Harris Funeral Homes, where it is a party. Kennedy was a voice for gay rights while his successor, Brett Kavanaugh, is regarded as more conservative. Aimee Stephens is the plaintiff in "R. The cases today are the court’s. LGBT Americans look to Supreme Court after being fired, 'because of sex' originally appeared on abcnews. On October 8, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a trio of cases — Bostock v. Sign up for the daily. Because the high court granted Tom's request for review, R. Harris Funeral Homes confronts a legal issue that is genuinely uncertain in the wake of a Supreme Court decision. WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday heard highly anticipated cases on whether federal civil rights law should apply to owner of the Detroit-area R. In Harris Funeral Homes, a funeral director in Michigan was fired by the family-owned business after disclosing a transition from man to woman, which also involved dressing as a woman. EEOC, involves the termination of a transgender employee. FERNDALE, Michigan — Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. Harris Funeral Homes. Clayton County, Georgia , center on men who say they were fired from their jobs for being gay, with a third case, R. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc. Alliance Defending Freedom 314,234 views. Harris Funeral Homes. The funeral home would have fired “a female employee who insisted on dressing as a man while working with grieving families. In the first case, the plaintiff asks the Supreme Court to include sexual orientation (LBGT) within the meaning of "sex" in Title VII for protection against discrimination. The status of being transgender (or transitioning) is now—on its own. In 2016, the U. Services unique as life Everyone’s life holds special stories that make them who they are. The court consolidated Bostock with a similar case, Altitude Express Inc. On Tuesday, the U. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The US Supreme Court will today hear a historic transgender civil rights case, to determine whether it is legal to fire someone for being trans. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit held that R. Transgender Discrimination: R. Bursch, attorney for Harris Funeral Homes, said the cases are about adherence to federal law -- as written. EEOC, involves the termination of a transgender employee. Supreme Court Hearing Arguments in Cases Set to Impact LGBT People's Workplace Rights. Rost’s family has been in the funeral home business since 1910. The facts of the case are fairly straightforward. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. Aimee Stephens lost her job at a suburban Detroit funeral home and she could lose her Supreme Court case over discrimination against transgender people. Harris Funeral Home after telling the owner she. He also notified the supervisor that when he returned to work, he would be wearing attire appropriate for a female employee. The US Supreme Court will today hear a historic transgender civil rights case, to determine whether it is legal to fire someone for being trans. Harris Funeral Homes appealed to the Supreme Court. Capitol Police have closed several streets near the U. Harris Funeral Homes, and his wife address the media at the United States Supreme Court in Washington on Tuesday, Oct. Clayton County, Georgia, and R. 2018), the Sixth Circuit held that Title VII prohibits discrimination based on gender identity. Harris Funeral Homes v. Donald Trump’s administration is urging the Supreme Court to rule that it’s legal to fire employees for being transgender. This article was written by Robert Barnes and Ann.